Menopause and You: Dealing With Your Hair

Take care of your hair during menopause! Here's how.

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Menopause and Hair Loss

Did you know that a massive 40% of women suffer from hair loss after menopause?

Not only does reducing amounts of oestrogen affect your skin and bones it also affects your hair.  As circulating oestrogen begins to reduce, it also starts to slow down the growth and strength of your hair.

There are lots of treatments for drastic hair loss, many of them quite effective however the major issue with reducing hair loss is that most women don’t notice until it is too late.

So if you are menopausal it could pay to keep an eye on your hair. If you are worried, see your doctor as there are some medical therapies that could help you.

Meanwhile, here are some simple things you can do to help maintain healthy hair and scalp:

  1. Stop Smoking. Smoking affects your oestrogen levels. The chemicals from the side stream smoke also damage your hair (not to mention your skin).
  1. Exercise makes your heart beat faster and moves blood around your body faster which brings extra oxygen to your skin and scalp.
  1. Reduce your use of heated appliances like straighteners and hairdryers. Oestrogen causes the strands of your hair to become thinner and heating it will cause it to break much more easily.
  1. Eat a healthy diet rich with vitamins and minerals. Following the recommended healthy eating guidelines, which are high in antioxidants and good fats, will make a difference.
  1. Use a good quality conditioner and look for leave-in hair masks. Especially those containing selenium and zinc.
  1. Also look out for shampoos, conditioners and hair products that are more natural. This includes hair dyes and colours, as they can be too harsh for thinning hair.
  1. Drink more water: Hydrate from the inside! Being dehydrated affects your hair too.
  1. Relax: Stress is well known to cause hair loss. This is a result of the extra cortisol produced when you are feeling stressed.