Quinoa & Co. have the Scoop on Aussie Hipsters

We may claim to be a nation of hipsters, but only half of us can pronounce ‘Quinoa’ correctly.

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Quinoa & Co by Sanhurst Fine Foods, crowdink.com, crowidnk.com.au, crowd ink, crowdink, food, foodie, healthy
Quinoa & Co by Sanhurst Fine Foods

We may claim to be a nation of hipsters, but only half of us can pronounce ‘Quinoa’ correctly.

A new study finds that despite the quinoa food trend, Aussies haven’t a clue what they’re eating.

Results from a survey conducted by Quinoa & Co, show that despite quinoa being a regular on hipster shopping lists, only 50% of Australians have ever tried it and hardly anyone knows why it’s supposed to be good for you.

In response, Quinoa & Co are bringing this ready to eat superfood to the shelves of Woolworths. Widely regarded as the national dish for any super foodie, quinoa rose to fame in the early 2010s, reaching a high point when the United Nations declared 2013 as the International Year of Quinoa.

Despite having an entire year dedicated to the power seed, very few Australians know anything about it, let alone how to pronounce it. In fact, half of Australia wrongly mistake it for a grain (when it’s actually a seed) and 50% have no idea how to pronounce it.

Quinoa, the 4000 year old crop grown for its seeds, is really a food for modern times. In 2015, the Harvard Public School of Health said that eating a bowl of gluten-free whole grain or cereal fibre daily reduces the risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Whilst quinoa is not technically considered to be a grain, the Wholegrains Council has dubbed it a “pseudo-cereal,” a term given to foods that are cooked and eaten like grains and contain a similar nutrient profile.

Quino & Co by Sanhurst Fine Foods , crowdink.com, crowdink.com.au, crowd ink, crowdink, food, foodie,
Quino & Co by Sanhurst Fine Foods

In fact, quinoa is one of the plant sources in the world to be considered a complete protein as it contains all nine of the essential amino acids that cannot be created by the human body, and must therefore be consumed. The high-protein, low-sugar and gluten-free profile of quinoa makes it the ideal food for anyone wanting to inject a dose of healthy eating into their diets. So why aren’t Aussies eating more of the superfood?

Here’s why:

  • 50% of Australians don’t know how to pronounce quinoa. 16% believe it is pronounced “kin-oa” and 9% believe it is pronounced “key-noa”
  • 47% think quinoa is a grain, instead of a seed.
  • 78% have no idea what makes quinoa good for you
  • 68% don’t know how to properly cook quinoa and don’t cook it themselves
  • 98% don’t know that there are over 120 types of quinoa in the world
  • 81% are clueless as to where quinoa comes from (it’s actually Peru)

As a result, Sandhurst Fine Foods have recognised an opportunity to make the super seed more accessible and convenient for the Australian market. Teaming up with their supplier in Peru – the heartland of quinoa – they have created a ready to eat range called Quinoa & Co.

The first of its kind, the product is now available on Woolworths’ shelves across the country for $4.99. The range will consist of 4 tastings, including a mixed quinoa with eggplant caponata, a white quinoa with artichoke, a red quinoa with piquillo pepper, cabbage & lentil and a plain option for those wanting to add their own toppings.

To celebrate the launch of the range, Quinoa & Co have worked with nutritionist Melanie Lionello of Naturally Nutritious to develop a series of recipes. The range and Melanie’s recipes are available for viewing at www.quinoaandco.com. So, step aside apples, we’re with quinoa now.