ACMI presents 24 Frames Per Second

In celebration of 24 Frames per Second, the ambitious exhibition of 24 newly commissioned moving-image installations presented at Sydney’s Carriageworks, ACMI presents a suite of four artist films exploring dance as a fundamentally collaborative medium where connections are made across form, practice, and territories.

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24 Frames Per Second [image source: ACMI], crowdink, crowd ink, crowdink.com, crowdink.com.au
24 Frames Per Second [image source: ACMI]

The Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) is a unique institution dedicated to promoting engagement with the moving image in all of its forms. The ACMI building is (rather appropriately) located right in the heart of Melbourne – in Federation Square just across from Flinder’s Street Railway Station.

23 MAY

In celebration of 24 Frames per Second, the ambitious exhibition of 24 newly commissioned moving-image installations presented at Sydney’s Carriageworks, ACMI presents a suite of four artist films exploring dance as a fundamentally collaborative medium where connections are made across form, practice and territories.

Following the screening, join curator and writer Nina Miall from Carriageworks, and artist, choreographer and curator Nat Cursio as they discuss the project. This conversation will address the commissioning process and interdisciplinary collaboration in contemporary art.

Works:

Kate Murphy, Push (2015)

Push explores the ageing body and mind, and their capacity for physical and echoic memory.

Ho Tzu Nyen, 1 or 2 Tigers (2015)

1 or 2 Tigers restages the first recorded meeting of the tiger and the white man; a key incident in Singaporean history.

Sriwhana Spong, The Fourth Notebook (2015)

New Zealand artist Sriwhana Spong’s work uses Russian dancer Vaslav Nijinsky’s (1889-1950) semi-sensical letter to mankind as the rhythmical score for new choreography by London-based dancer Benjamin Ord.

Nat Cursio & Daniel Crooks, at least for a while anyway (2015)

A collaboration between Nat Cursio and Daniel Crooks, at least for a while anyway locates Don Asker, a treasure of Australian dance practice, amongst his ‘other’ life as a farmer.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.

Don’t miss this event. Tickets here.


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ACMI is a unique institution at the heart of Melbourne's iconic meeting place, Federation Square, the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) celebrates, explores and promotes the moving image in all its forms - film, television and digital culture. Through award-winning Australian and international exhibitions, films, festivals, live events, creative workshops, education programs and resources, ACMI provides unsurpassed ways to engage with the moving image.