Valentine’s Day Doesn’t Have to Break the Bank to Make a Difference.

Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day

Typically Valentine’s Day is celebrated by young people who are in a new relationship and feel the need to prove their love for their significant other. But, coming off the holiday season probably without a stable income doesn’t leave you in the best position to have the most romantic day ever. Communicate with your partner if you’re feeling financially stressed and remember that money shouldn’t matter when it comes to love. But if you still want to impress, fear not lovebirds, here are some cheap ideas that will still make February 14thspecial.

  1. Be strategic with your dinner plans.

Valentine’s Day this year falls on a Friday meaning that the usual, fine dining restaurants will be unavailable if you didn’t book in advance. Check out your favourite restaurant’s social media; you’ll find a lot of them have deals that provide perks like free drinks. On the other hand, ditch the fancy restaurant and have a meal at home. You won’t be pressured to leave your table and can eat whatever you feel like.

 

  1. Stay away from the traditional gifts.

$60 for a bouquet of roses? No way! Valentine’s Day is fuelled by consumerism, but don’t fall for the trap. According to Commonwealth Bank’s general manager, Michael Baumann, the average Aussie spends around $136 on the day, and that’s just one half of the relationship. Chocolate may be mainstream, but why not bake them their favourite flavour cake to save some coin. On the other hand, buy them something that they will actually use unlike a teddy bear that won’t be touched after the 14th, so that they get value out of the gift. A mug for a tea lover, for example, is a great cheap gift.

 

  1. Complete Acts of Service.

Valentine’s Day may be all about the tangible items and memory-making experiences, but going above and beyond for your partner will truly make them feel loved. While I always recommend being a decent person by helping your significant other, this is the time to complete tasks that they haven’t had time to do themselves, have been asking you to do and assist with something they’re struggling with.